Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Who Was The Most Reluctant Convert?

I used to think that I was the most reluctant convert. As a teenager, I fought the Lord, and the Lord won. My struggle lasted seven years, but C.S. Lewis' lasted much longer as I learned this past weekend after attending a play in Charlotte,

This production by Max McLean was much like his earlier excellent dramatizations of "The Screwtape Letters" which I saw in NYC and "The Great Divorce" which I also saw in Charlotte.

In "The Most Reluctant Convert" C.S.Lewis speaks to the audience and relates his early life and upbringing through the time of his conversion which occurred after he was established at Oxford. I found myself relating in some ways to Lewis' struggle, but while he was an intellectual whose private education grounded him in literature, Greek, Latin, and logical discourse, my education was in the American style in which all are forced to study a wide range of subjects: science, mathematics, social studies, English, foreign language,  etc. We excel at creating "masters of none" in American High Schools. Our young folk must look to specialize after they gain admittance to a university, and even then young adults usually have to take required courses that are not in their major field. I have always assumed this is intended to produce a more well-rounded adult. I am not sure that is always desirable. C.S. Lewis turned out okay in spite of or because of his more directed educational experience.

Although Lewis' arguments against Christianity as presented by McLean were not identical to mine (in large part due to our differing upbringings, education, and natures), I found myself relating to the forces influencing the young mind to keep up its opposition to God. No matter what argument an apologist tries on a reluctant, or like Lewis and myself, a combative potential convert, something has to happen to that individual apart from the action of the apologist. Max McLean presented that something using his hands demonstrating Lewis having his heart opened by God. Following that, McLean stated that Lewis did exactly what I did. He got down on his knees and for the first time really prayed, confessing the sins against God and his Word and accepting his forgiveness.

For me, the take home message of the story is that God comes to each of us as individuals, He might use our friends, and He breaks down our defenses in a highly individualized way, using the Gospel, but we always must accept Him on his terms, not ours.

In the course of the play, there was much, much more to chew on, some of which was serious and some of which was presented with a touch of humor. I highly recommend this show to Anglicans and non-Anglicans alike. Indeed, the audience in Charlotte contained a large number of church groups from denominational as well as non-denominational congregations. I believe most attendees were not Anglicans.


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